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(Vatican Radio) This weekend here in Rome, the Church is marking the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy in a special way with the Jubilee of Deacons.  As their very title suggests – taken as it is from the Greek word for “servant”, diakonos – Deacons are ordained to a ministry of service in the Church: they proclaim the Good News liturgically, they assist priests at the Altar, and they preach to the faithful on matters pertaining to authentic Christian living.  Deacons also bring the Blessed Sacrament to the sick in hospital and to the housebound: they visit prisoners, offering them both companionship and counsel; they baptize, receive the marriage vows of couples entering Holy Matrimony, and they pray for the dead. Two Deacons from the United States, the Rev. Messrs. Doug Breckenridge and Greg Kandra, visited Vatican Radio during the course of their pilgrimage to celebrate the Jubilee of Deacons, and spoke with us about the joys and challenges of their vocation, especially in the present generation of the Church in the West, which recovered the Permanent Diaconate as a distinct ministry during and after the II Vatican Ecumenical Council. Click below to hear our extended conversation Deacon Greg Kandra and Deacon Doug Breckenridge “I think – and I think many people would agree with this – it is one of the great success stories of Vatican II,” said Deacon Kandra (of the Diocese of Brooklyn , NY, who, in “civilian” life, was a producer for CBS News , and who now works closely with the Catholic Near East Welfare Association and blogs at Aleteia ). “In my diocese in particular,” added Deacon Breckenridge  (of the Diocese of Dallas , Tx., who made his career in the banking and finance industry, and who has been committed for several years to working with the Children's Medical Center ), “there are three [Diaconate formation] classes going at once: so, every two years, they start a new class of thirty to forty men,” who undertake the roughly six-year program of formation for the Diaconate, which often takes place on nights and weekends over that six-year period. Both Deacon Kandra and Deacon Breckenridge are married – and while there is no requirement that men in the Permanent Diaconate be married, the vast majority of men who pursue their studies to the end and accept Ordination are married when they do. “My wife was very supportive,” explained Deacon Kandra, “she and I prayed together when I was discerning this – in early 2002 – and she said, ‘I just feel this is something you are supposed to do,’ and I said, ‘I do too.’.” Deacon Breckenridge explained that Deacons’ wives do not only play a central role in discernment, but also in ministry. “A wife can choose to have her husband taken out of formation at any time, without him knowing that his wife has asked,” said Deacon Breckenridge. He went on to say that his ministry has informed his married life. “It has deepened our relationship,” he said, “we both are more active in the Church,” since he was ordained, and Mrs. Breckenridge also contributes to her husband’s service specifically as a Deacon. “She is my best editor for my homilies,” he explained. “We also help in all areas of marriage ministry,” Deacon Breckenridge continued, “I think it is one thing that, as a married couple, we bring,” i.e. their experience of married life, which they are happy to share with couples seeking the Sacrament of Matrimony from the Church. “Being the wife of a Deacon is almost a vocation unto itself,” offered Deacon Kandra. “My wife is a great collaborator – a great prayer warrior,” he continued, “she makes it possible for me to do what I do.” Deacon Kandra concluded the conversation with high praise for the Diaconate as a calling of service that is one of constant surprise and discovery. “I always say it was the second-best decision I ever made: the first one being to marry my wife,” he said. “It is such an adventure, and it is such a joy: I wake up some days and I can’t believe I get to do what I do.” (from Vatican Radio)... 6 hours 39 min
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Saturday received some four hundred children of different ethnicities, cultures and religions – many of them migrants and refugees – who had traveled to Rome from Calabria in southern Italy aboard the “Children’s Train” – the Treno dei Bambini – an annual initiative of the Pontifical Council for Culture, which this year has as its theme, “Carried by waves”: a theme that is designed at once to invoke the often deadly danger of migration, and the hope in the promise of a better future that drives people – along with the threat of torture, slavery and death – to flee their homelands and seek a better life on strange and distant shores. Click below to hear our full report The children arrived Saturday at St. Peter’s railway station in the Vatican: their conveyance brining also the pain of the experience of its young passengers – their undeniable suffering, weaved together with the care and affection offered the children by the John XXIII Association, and the work of the “Quattrocanti” Children’s Orchestra of Palermo (in which boys and girls of eight different ethnicities are involved), as well as the initiative of Mary Salvia, principal of a school in Vibo Marina, who brought to Pope Francis the money from her school’s collection for the children of Lesbos and a letter signed by her pupils, which Cardinal Ravasi read to the Pope. “We children promise that we will welcome anyone who arrives in our country: we shall never consider anyone who has a different skin color, or who speaks a different language, or who professes a different religion from ours, a dangerous enemy.” In an unscripted exchange with the young travelers, Pope Francis focused on the human cost of indifference to the plight of migrants, recounting the story and sharing the words of a rescue worker who brought the Holy Father the life vest of a young migrant who drowned at sea. “He brought me this jacket,” said Pope Francis, “and with tears in his eyes he said to me, ‘Father, I couldn’t do it – there was a little girl on the waves, and I did all I could, but I couldn’t save her: only her life vest was left.’” Then, indicating the Jacket, the Holy Father said, “I do not [tell you this because I] want you to be sad, but [because] you are brave and you [should] know the truth: they are in danger –  many boys and girls, small children, men, women – they are in danger,” he said. “Let us think of this little girl: what was her name? I do not know: a little girl with no name. Each of you give her the name you would like, each in his heart. She is in heaven, she is looking on us.” A teachable moment among many afforded by the occasion, as was the moment in which one of the Pope’s young visitors asked him what it means “to be Pope”: The Holy Father replied, “[to do] the good that I can do.” He went on to say, “I feel that Jesus called me to this: Jesus wanted me to be a Christian, and a Christian must do [the good he can]; and Jesus also wanted me to be a priest, and a bishop – and a priest and a bishop must do [the good they can]; I feel that Jesus is calling me to do this – that’s what I feel,” he said. (from Vatican Radio)... 8 hours 38 min
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Saturday met with Mr. Tony Tan Keng Yam, the President of the Republic of Singapore, who subsequently met with the Vatican Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, who was accompanied by Archbishop Paul Richard Gallagher, the Secretary for Relations with States. A statement issued by the Holy See Press Office said the meeting was “cordial” and the parties spoke about “the good relations between the Holy See and Singapore, as well as the collaboration between Church and State, especially in the educational and social fields.” The statement also said they also spoke about certain international issues and the regional political situation, with particular reference to the importance of interreligious and intercultural dialogue for the promotion of human rights, stability, justice and peace in Southeast Asia. (from Vatican Radio)... 11 hours 53 min
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Friday met with Hebe de Bonafini, 87, the founder and president of the Asociación Madres de Plaza de Mayo (Association of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo). The Association was formed by the mothers of those dissidents who “disappeared” ( los desaparecidos ) during the 1976-1983 military dictatorship in Argentina. During  this period,  Hebe de Bonafini lost two sons and her daughter-in-law. She spoke after her meeting with the Holy Father, and told journalists the two had embraced and that apologized for earlier criticisms she had made of the Pope. She also said they discussed the current situation in Argentina, especially the large number of people out of work, and struggling to survive. (from Vatican Radio)... 13 hours 5 min
(Vatican Radio)  Deacons and their families from around the world are convening in Rome this weekend to participate in a Jubilee for Deacons as part of the year-long celebrations for the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. The Diaconate is a ministry rooted in mercy, founded originally so that the Church has specialists to engage in certain works while priests can focus on celebrating the sacraments. Listen to Alexander MacDonald's report: Reverend David Howell is a deacon studying in Rome and a seminarian at the Venerable English College. He told us a bit about the origins of this ministry in the Church. "It began with an argument in the early Church over two groups, those who had come from the Jews and those who had come from the Greeks, and they were arguing about the distribution between their two groups. So they needed men full of faith in the Holy Spirit who could sort out these domestic problems, while the Apostles were preaching, spreading the Good News. And they ordained seven men, who they knew were full of faith and the Holy Spirit, who could sort out these problems. It's very interesting because as soon as they do that the Bible tells us 'the Word of God increased and the number of the disciples multiplied greatly." He also says the role of the deacon is rooted in mercy, foremost because of its connection to the sacraments. "Well, I think the two moments of mercy that come to my mind when I think of being a deacon are the two sacraments that the Deacon administers: the Sacrament of Baptism. There is probably no greater act of mercy than that." And as thousands of deacons descend on Rome, it’s appropriate to celebrate the diaconate in the context of the Jubilee of Mercy with the Holy Father. "Mercy is a message that we need to hear again and again because it's almost too good to be true. And I think the Deacon is one who can really give that message. The Deacon, one of his roles is to proclaim the Gospel and to preach and so I think that's really where the diaconate comes into the Year of Mercy." The program of events for the weekend includes making a pilgrimage through one of the Holy Doors in Rome, sessions focusing on the ways Deacons make God’s mercy known to the faithful and culminates in a Mass with Pope Francis on Sunday. (from Vatican Radio)... 17 hours 14 min
(Vatican Radio)  Pope Francis has sent his condolences to the Bishop of Bergamo, Italy for the death of Cardinal Loris Francesco Capovilla, the former private secretary of Pope John XXIII.  Upon hearing of the Cardinal’s passing 26 May 2016 at the age of 100, Pope Francis wrote in a telegram to Bishop Francesco Beschi, in whose diocese Cardinal Capovilla lived the last years of his life:  “I think with affection of this dear brother who in his long and fruitful existence gave witness to the Gospel with joy and obediently served the Church, first in the diocese of Venice, then with attentive affection at the side of Pope John XXIII, of whose memory he was the zealous custodian and expert interpreter. In his episcopal ministry, especially in Chieti-Vasto and Loreto (Italy), he was always a pastor totally dedicated to the wellbeing of all priests and the faithful …with a solid fidelity to the teachings of the Second Vatican Council.” Pope Francis concluded his telegram with a prayer, “with the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary and of Saint Mark the Evangelist,” so that the Lord will receive his soul “nel Gaudio” and “in eternal peace, ” and offered his apostolic blessing to all those who grieve his passing. Cardinal Capovilla was born on 14 October 1915 in Pontelungo, northern Italy. He was ordained a priest in Venice, Italy, in 1940; he was appointed and ordained Archbishop of Chieti, in 1967.  From 1971 to 1988, he served as prelate of Loreto, Italy On 22 February 2014, Pope Francis elevated him cardinal and, cardinal-priest of Santa Maria in Trastevere, Rome. (from Vatican Radio)... 1 day 9 hours
(Vatican Radio)   Pope Francis received the President of Costa Rica, Luis Guillermo Solís Rivera, who was accompanied by his wife and daughter, in the Vatican on Friday for a private audience.  A press release from the Holy See Press Office called the meeting 'cordial', saying the Holy Father and Mr. Solís spoke about the good relationship between the Holy See and Costa Rica.  Mr. Solís expressed his appreciation for the important contribution of the Catholic Church to Costa Rican society, especially in the areas of education, health care, the promotion of human and spiritual values, and charitable works. The two leaders also spoke about several themes of common interest, including the protection of human life, migration, and drug trafficking. Finally, mention was made of the regional situation and a number of international issues. Following his audience with the Holy Father, Mr. Solís met with the Vatican Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, and the Secretary for Relations with States, Archbishop Paul Gallagher. (from Vatican Radio)... 1 day 9 hours
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Friday greeted members of the Congregation of Don Orione, the Sons of Divine Providence, on the occasion of their 14th General Chapter. The Congregation takes its inspiration from its founder, St Luigi Orione, whose motto was: “Do good to all; harm no one.” St Luigi Orione is remembered for his commitment to social justice and the service of those in need, a service guided and inspired by the teachings of the Catholic Church. Listen to Christopher Wells' report:  In his address to the General Chapter, Pope Francis said, “The whole Church is called to journey with Jesus along the paths of the world, to encounter the humanity of today, which needs, as Don Orione wrote, ‘the bread of the body, and the divine balm of the Faith’.” To put these words into practice today, the Pope said, the members of the Congregation must keep in mind their identity as “servants of Christ and of the poor.” “You were called and consecrated by God,” he said, “to remain with Jesus and to serve Him in the poor and in those excluded from society." He called them to vigilance, that their faith “might not become an ideology,” or their charity a mere “philanthropy.” Pope Francis recalled that, even during the lifetime of Don Orione, the Orionine Fathers were known as “running priests” because they “seemed to be always on the go, in the midst of the people, with the rapid pace of those who care.” He exhorted them, “with Don Orione, to to not remain enclosed within your particular environment, but to ‘go out’.”  At the same time, it is important to never “lose sight of the Church” or of their own religious community. Rather, he said, “your heart must be there in your ‘cenaculum’, but then needs to go out to bring the mercy of God to all, without distinction.” (from Vatican Radio)... 1 day 10 hours
(Vatican Radio) In a tribute to  Cardinal Loris Capovilla, personal secretary to  Saint John XXIII,who passed away on the 26th of May, we bring you a Vatican Radio archive interview in which he explains how this twentieth century Pope rather than arouse in us feelings of nostalgia should encourage us to look towards the future. Listen to a programme presented and produced by Veronica Scarisbrick: As ked  what he meant by that comment the cardinal replied that as Pope John once said we are not called to be custodians of a shrine, a reliquary or a museum but rather to be custodians of a garden where is sown the seed of the Word, of the Word Incarnate. In fact he went on to say, we are called to cultivate our garden, to foster the advent of a new Pentecost, a new Easter, a new Spring, not just for our personal joy but for the joy of all of humanity. Cardinal Capovilla also shares the idea that he viewed the Pope as someone sent by God. " I never felt", he remarked in this interview,  " that I was collaborator or a secretary and still less an advisor, I would have perceived this as a scandalous assumption". What he did experience, he highlights, was the joy that came with being close to a man who was certainly guided by God and who set the seed for the future of the Church although it was difficult to grasp to the full what was in his soul: "... as I said he set the seed for the future".   (from Vatican Radio)... 1 day 11 hours
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis celebrated Mass on the steps of Rome’s cathedral basilica of St. John Lateran Thursday evening, to mark the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Our Lord, Jesus Christ. In the homily he prepared for the occasion, Pope Francis focused on the Eucharist as the source of Christian strength. “From the outset,” he said, “it is the Eucharist which becomes the centre and pattern of the life of the Church: but we think also of all the saints – famous or anonymous – who have ‘broken’ themselves, their own life, in order to ‘give something to eat’ to their brothers and sisters.” The Holy Father went on to say, “How many mothers, how many fathers, together with the slices of bread they provide each day on the tables of their homes, have broken their hearts to let their children grow, and grow well; how many Christians, as responsible citizens, have broken their own lives to defend the dignity of all, especially the poorest, the marginalized and those discriminated;  where do they find the strength to do this?” he asked. “It is in the Eucharist: in the power of the Risen Lord’s love, who today too breaks bread for us and repeats: ‘Do this in remembrance of me’.” Click below to hear our report The liturgy was followed by a torchlight Eucharistic procession from the Lateran Basilica to the nearby Basilica of St. Mary Major: an occasion for parish groups, sodalities and charitable and fraternal organisations of all kinds to give public witness to the central mystery of the faith: that Jesus Christ is really, truly, substantially present: body, blood, soul and divinity, under the species of bread and wine. Ordinary citizens participated too, whether watching from the windows and balconies of the buildings that line the route from the Lateran basilica along the via Merulana to the Basilica of St Mary Major, or joining on foot in the procession itself. All told, the Mass and procession rad roughly two and a half hours, and ended as the fullness of night fell on the city in late spring, with the Pope leading the faithful in Eucharistic adoration and offering solemn benediction. (from Vatican Radio)... 2 days 1 hour
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis delivered the homily at Mass being celebrated on the steps of Rome's cathedral Basilica of St. John Lateran on Thursday, to mark the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Our Lord. Below, please find the full text of the Holy Father's prepared remarks, in their official English translation. ******************************** « Do this in remembrance of me » ( 1 Cor 11 :24-25). Twice the Apostle Paul, writing to the community in Corinth, recalls this command of Jesus in his account of the institution of the Eucharist.  It is the oldest testimony we have to the words of Christ at the Last Supper.  “Do this”.  That is, take bread, give thanks and break it; take the chalice, give thanks, and share it.  Jesus gives the command to repeat this action by which he instituted the memorial of his own Pasch, and in so doing gives us his Body and his Blood.  This action reaches us today: it is the “doing” of the Eucharist which always has Jesus as its subject, but which is made real through our poor hands anointed by the Holy Spirit.  “Do this”.  Jesus on a previous occasion asked his disciples to “do” what was so clear to him, in obedience to the will of the Father.  In the Gospel passage that we have just heard, Jesus says to the disciples in front of the tired and hungry crowds: “Give them something to eat yourselves” ( Lk 9:13).  Indeed, it is Jesus who blesses and breaks the loaves and provides sufficient food to satisfy the whole crowd, but it is the disciples who offer the five loaves and two fish.  Jesus wanted it this way: that, instead of sending the crowd away, the disciples would put at his disposal what little they had.  And there is another gesture: the pieces of bread, broken by the holy and venerable hands of Our Lord, pass into the poor hands of the disciples, who distribute these to the people.  This too is the disciples “doing” with Jesus; with him they are able to “give them something to eat”.  Clearly this miracle was not intended merely to satisfy hunger for a day, but rather it signals what Christ wants to accomplish for the salvation of all mankind, giving his own flesh and blood (cf. Jn 6:48-58).  And yet this needs always to happen through those two small actions: offering the few loaves and fish which we have; receiving the bread broken by the hands of Jesus and giving it to all. Breaking : this is the other word explaining the meaning of those words: “Do this in remembrance of me”.  Jesus was broken; he is broken for us.  And he asks us to give ourselves, to break ourselves, as it were, for others.  This “breaking bread” became the icon, the sign for recognizing Christ and Christians.  We think of Emmaus:  they knew him “in the breaking of the bread” ( Lk 24:35).  We recall the first community of Jerusalem:  “They held steadfastly… to the breaking of the bread” ( Acts 2:42).  From the outset it is the Eucharist which becomes the centre and pattern of the life of the Church.  But we think also of all the saints – famous or anonymous – who have “broken” themselves, their own life, in order to “give something to eat” to their brothers and sisters.  How many mothers, how many fathers, together with the slices of bread they provide each day on the tables of their homes, have broken their hearts to let their children grow, and grow well!  How many Christians, as responsible citizens, have broken their own lives to defend the dignity of all, especially the poorest, the marginalized and those discriminated!  Where do they find the strength to do this?  It is in the Eucharist:  in the power of the Risen Lord’s love, who today too breaks bread for us and repeats: “Do this in remembrance of me”.  May this action of the Eucharistic procession, which we will carry out shortly, respond to Jesus’ command.  An action to commemorate him; an action to give food to the crowds of today; an act to break open our faith and our lives as a sign of Christ’s love for this city and for the whole world.  (from Vatican Radio)... 2 days 4 hours
(Vatican Radio) The Prefect-emeritus of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Cardinal Francis Arinze, shared a reflection with Vatican Radio for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Our Lord, Jesus Christ. The central focus of Cardinal Arinze’s extended meditation was the abiding Eucharistic faith of the Church, and the great joy of Christians in giving witness to that faith – especially in the Eucharistic processions that mark the Feast of Corpus Christi here at Rome and in countless towns and cities around the world. “Everybody is there,” he exclaimed. “Flowers, singing – the excellent Eucharistic hymns that incorporate very much the faith of the Church in the Holy Eucharist – listen to them, sing them, read them,” he said. “It is just a wonderful feast.” Click below to listen to Cardinal Arinze’s extended meditation (from Vatican Radio)... 2 days 5 hours

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From: Live Catholic Headlines
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Vatican City, May 28, 2016 / 10:54 am (EWTN News/CNA).- The story of a young migrant girl who drowned at sea was at the heart of Pope Francis' address to some 400 children who on Saturday had traveled to the Vatican from the southern Italian region of Calabria. 7 hours 59 min
Vatican City, May 28, 2016 / 07:58 am (EWTN News/CNA).- On Saturday, Pope Francis met with the president of the Republic of Singapore, marking 35 years of diplomatic relations between the Southeast Asian country and the Holy See, and the first ever state visit by a Singaporean president to a Pope. 10 hours 55 min
Erbil, Iraq, May 28, 2016 / 06:13 am (EWTN News/CNA).- On Friday, the first of three rounds of displaced Iraqi children made their First Communion in a refugee camp in Erbil, providing a silver lining to an otherwise bleak situation. 12 hours 40 min
Santiago, Chile, May 28, 2016 / 05:02 pm (EWTN News/CNA).- A group of 61 cloistered nuns from six monasteries in Santiago, Chile made an historic visit to the local Women's Prison Center to spend time with the inmates and attend Mass with them. 13 hours 51 min
Vatican City, May 27, 2016 / 12:55 pm (EWTN News/CNA).- When Pope Francis met with the Sons of Divine Providence – also known as the Orionine Fathers – on Friday, he urged them to be faithful to the charism of their founder, St. Luigi Orione. So what is this charism? 1 day 5 hours
Washington D.C., May 27, 2016 / 07:46 am (EWTN News/CNA).- Religious liberty was among the primary concerns that ultimately defeated controversial legislation aimed at enforcing an LGBT executive order twice this week. 1 day 11 hours
Bergamo, Italy, May 27, 2016 / 04:04 pm (EWTN News/CNA).- Cardinal Loris Capovilla, St. John XXIII's personal secretary, died May 26 at the age of 100. He had been the closest collaborator of the sainted "Good Pope John" for ten years. 1 day 14 hours
Washington D.C., May 27, 2016 / 04:02 am (EWTN News/CNA).- Earlier this month, a report from Gizmodo dropped the equivalent of a social media bomb – several former Facebook employees said the company routinely suppressed conservative news in the social media giant's "trending news" section. 1 day 14 hours
Geneva, Switzerland, May 27, 2016 / 01:57 am (EWTN News/CNA).- The Vatican has voiced support for global health care goals and has said that Catholic institutions are committed to combating problems like communicable diseases. 1 day 16 hours
Rome, Italy, May 26, 2016 / 12:44 pm (EWTN News/CNA).- In breaking bread for his disciples Christ gave an example of what it means to allow oneself to be broken for the good of others, Pope Francis said on the feast of Corpus Christi, explaining that it is the Eucharist which gives us the strength to do this. 2 days 6 hours
Rome, Italy, May 26, 2016 / 04:02 am (EWTN News/CNA).- There's a demon that specializes in attacking the family, said exorcist César Truqui, a priest who participated in a course on exorcism held in Rome last year. 2 days 14 hours
London, England, May 26, 2016 / 01:26 am (EWTN News/CNA).- The Catholic bishops of England and Wales are ready to support the government's proposed prison reforms outlined in Queen Elizabeth II's speech to Parliament. 2 days 17 hours

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From: The site of the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati.
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IMAGE: CNS photo/Jim Lo Scalzo, EPA

By Carol Zimmermann

WASHINGTON (CNS) — Immediately after the Supreme Court sent the contraceptive case back to the lower courts May 16, some called the decision a punt — the football analogy of sending the ball back to the other team — or in this case the lower courts.

But the analogy falls short on a practical level because the seven consolidated cases in Zubik will be sent back to the lower courts with a very different look — bearing the stamp of being vacated by the nation’s high court.

The 3rd, 5th, 10th and D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals — which ruled in favor of the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate and did not see it as posing a substantial burden to the petitioners’ free exercise of religion — now must give another look at the issue equipped with the new information submitted to the Supreme Court showing a possible compromise.

Although the justices’ unanimous decision in Zubik v. Burwell took many by surprise, others said they saw something like this coming when the Supreme Court essentially showed its hand asking both sides to provide ways to implement the contraceptive mandate that would satisfy both sides.

“Contrary to most press coverage, this was not a punt,” said Michael McConnell, a law professor at Stanford Law School in California, writing about the Zubik ruling. He described the decision as “a compromise in which the Little Sisters won the case but no precedent was set for the future. This is unorthodox, but arguably Solomonic,” he added.

Hannah Smith, senior counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which is representing the Little Sisters of the Poor in the case, similarly didn’t buy the sports analogy that grabbed headlines.

“I don’t see it as a punt at all,” she told Catholic News Service May 27. She said the Supreme Court was not just returning the cases to the lower courts but was “very specific in its order and outlined several points” such as forbidding the government from levying fines on the groups that objected to the contraceptive coverage, erasing previous court decisions and telling the courts to essentially find a feasible resolution.

In other words, when the court sent these cases back, it also sent guidelines for a new way forward.

Smith said the court’s decision was essentially telling the federal government: “You can do this in a different way, now you have to go back and do it.”

She said it is going to take some time for this to work through the courts and she couldn’t predict a time frame for it.

It has already been nearly five years that religious groups have been involved in challenging the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate. The Department of Health and Human Services announced an “interim final rule” in August 2011 requiring that coverage of contraceptives approved by the Food and Drug Administration be included in most employees’ health plans. The rule provided a narrow religious exemption to the mandate that only applied to houses of worship and did not include most religious universities, schools, social service agencies, outreach ministries or health care providers.

The plaintiffs don’t seem daunted by the time it is taking for a resolution. Washington Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl said in a statement after the Supreme Court’s decision that the court’s opinion offered a path forward but “this struggle will continue.”

The Washington Archdiocese is one of seven plaintiffs in the consolidated Zubik case.

Now the question for both sides is whether the courts follow the Supreme Court’s cue and find a compromise.

In a post for scotusblog.com, University of Notre Dame law professor Richard Garnett wrote that the courts could possibly “extend unwarranted deference to the government’s assertions about ‘compelling interests’ and the least restrictive ways of accomplishing them or engage in ungenerous second-guessing of religious claimants’ descriptions of the burdens imposed by government action on their religious exercise.”

Legal experts say the government could either decline to cooperate on a solution or could change its regulations to implement the Supreme Court’s opinion and adopt a less restrictive alternative for religious employers who currently would need to have a third party to provide contraceptive coverage through their health insurance. However, the government would still need to determine how to accommodate religious objectors that self-insure.

While the final outcome hangs in the balance, Garnett said the case itself highlights a troubling sign about the accommodation of religion.

“To the extent, the right to religious freedom is regarded as a luxury good, a license to do wrong, or as special pleading by the culture war’s losers, it is increasingly vulnerable,” Garnett wrote. “This should concern us all, because believers and nonbelievers alike benefit from a legal and cultural commitment to religious freedom and have a stake in the legal regime that respects and protects it.”

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Follow Zimmermann on Twitter @carolmaczim.

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1 day 12 min

IMAGE: CNS photo/Lucy Nicholson, Reuters

By

WASHINGTON (CNS) — Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of Los Angeles said in a May 25 statement that a planned increase in federal immigration raids is “yet another depressing sign of the failed state of American immigration policy.” The raids were announced in mid-May.

Archbishop Gomez’ comment was echoed by Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio L. Elizondo, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Migration. The archbishop is chairman-elect of the committee.

“These operations spark panic among our parishes,” Bishop Elizondo said in a May 25 statement. “No person, migrant or otherwise, should have to fear leaving their home to attend church or school. No person should have to fear being torn away from their family and returned to danger.”

While saying he recognized the federal government’s role in upholding immigration laws, he said the deportations would not be “an effective deterrent” to migration because these “vulnerable populations” are facing a humanitarian crisis in their home countries.

On May 24, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement personnel deported a mother and her 14-year-old daughter from the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas.

ICE took the action despite knowing that the family was afraid of being killed in their home country, that their asylum claim had never been heard, and despite knowing that attorneys had requested a stay of removal and were in the midst of filing an appeal, according to Katie Shepherd, managing attorney for the Cara Family Detention Pro Bono Project, which provides legal representation and undertakes advocacy on behalf of mothers and children held in federal family detention centers.

According to Shepherd, ICE also knew that attorneys had requested a stay of removal for the family and were in the midst of filing an appeal.

“ICE swiftly deported the mother and her child, informing counsel only after the fact. It is outrageous that, knowing that her appeal was in the works and that she had expressed a fear of return, ICE chose to hustle the family out of the detention center in the dark of night and put them on a plane before the courthouse doors opened,” Shepherd said in a May 25 statement.

“Just like in January, we are seeing mothers and children who are confused, disoriented, and terrified for themselves and their children,” she added.

In January, Bishop Elizondo and Bishop Kevin W. Vann of Orange, California, chairman of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, wrote to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson about recent raids that had netted 121 undocumented immigrants in a three-day span, many of them mothers and children.

“Our organizations have firsthand knowledge that these actions have generated fear among immigrants and have made their communities more distrustful of law enforcement and vulnerable to misinformation, exploitation and fraud,” the two bishops told Johnson. “To send migrant children and families back to their home countries would put many of them in grave danger because they would face threats of violence and for some, even death.”

CLINIC is one of four partners in the Cara Project. The others are the American Immigration Council, the American Immigration Lawyers Association and the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services.

“This family is just the latest in the string of lives destroyed by a government that refuses to administer our refugee protection system with the care it requires. Sadly, ICE’s harsh enforcement tactics will put many more vulnerable people at risk,” said the Cara Project’s Shepherd.

Bishop Daniel E. Flores of Brownsville, Texas, also issued a statement May 25 about the new wave of deportation raids.

“Children and families should not be used as pawns in a politics of deportation aimed more at maintaining the illusion that we have a viable immigration policy in this country than at actually addressing the issue,” he said. “The entire system needs reform; it fails to protect the most basic of human goods. Those fleeing violence should be accorded due process protection.”

Over the past year or more, the Brownsville Diocese, which is in the Rio Grande River Valley, has had an increase of immigrants with numbers as high as 200 on some days. Mostly from Central America, the immigrants receive help at the diocesan respite center at Sacred Heart Church in McAllen at continue north to other states.

Michelle Mendez, who represents some clients for CLINIC and does training and legal support as well, also moderates a closed Facebook page for women who were detained. Introduced just last October, the group, she said, now has 750 members.

Having worked in direct services for many years prior to joining CLINIC, Mendez said, “I learned that clients, despite lacking sophistication in some areas, had on their phones What’s App or something that’s cheaper to call internationally and Facebook, because they want to connect with folks all over.”

On the page, “we give them guidance on the removal proceedings,” Mendez said. “They have a lot of misinformation or lack of information. They think that reporting to ICE on a monthly basis is the same as going to court. Or that changing your address with ICE is the same as changing your address with the court.” Neither is true, she added, and some women have been tripped up by this false belief.

– – –

Contributing to this story was Mark Pattison.

 

– – –

Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

1 day 3 hours

By Junno Arocho Esteves

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — To follow the path of Christ means to serve the poor and the downtrodden while not turning Christian virtues simply into ideas and humanitarian endeavors, Pope Francis said.

“In them, you touch and serve the flesh of Christ and grow in union with him, while always keeping watch so that faith does not become an ideology and charity is not reduced to philanthropy so that the church doesn’t end up becoming an NGO,” the pope told members of the general chapter of the Little Work of Divine Providence May 27.

Founded by St. Luigi Orione, the order is comprised of two religious congregations — the Orionine Fathers and the Little Missionary Sisters of Charity — who care primarily for the sick, the elderly and people with learning disabilities.

The pope encouraged the religious congregations to follow the example of their founder, who sought to heal the wounds of people in need of “bread for the body and the divine consolation of faith.”

“With Don Orione, I also exhort you to not remain closed in your surroundings, but to go out. There is much need of priests and religious who do not remain solely in charitable institutions — albeit necessary — but who also know how to go beyond their own boundaries in order to bring to every environment, even the most distant, the perfume of Christ’s charity,” the pope said.

Pope Francis also called on them to not lose sight of the “church’s mission to bring God’s mercy to all without distinction.”

Their service to the church, he said, will be all the more effective by taking care of their personal commitment to Christ and their own spiritual formation.

By “giving a witness to the beauty” of consecrated life, the Little Work of Divine Providence can offer an example of the “good life of the religious servants of Christ and the poor,” especially to younger generations, the pope said.

“Life begets life; a holy and happy religious person can inspire new vocations,” Pope Francis said.

– – –

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

– – –

Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

1 day 5 hours
A man holding a card promoting the Archdiocese of Cincinnati's "Civilize It'" campaign stands with a cutout of Pope Francis April 4 during festivities before the Cincinnati Reds season-opening game. The campaign is designed to encourage people to be respectful of the views of others during the electoral campaigns. (CNS photo/Mimi London, Archdiocese of Cincinnati)A man holding a card promoting the Archdiocese of Cincinnati’s “Civilize It'” campaign stands with a cutout of Pope Francis April 4 during festivities before the Cincinnati Reds season-opening game. The campaign is designed to encourage people to be respectful of the views of others during the electoral campaigns. (CNS photo/Mimi London, Archdiocese of Cincinnati)

CLEVELAND — Amid the anger, the attacks and the sometimes boisterous nature of this year’s presidential campaign, the Archdiocese of Cincinnati is encouraging parishioners to remember that civility in politics is a virtue.

To bring the point home, the archdiocesan Catholic Social Action Office has unveiled the “Civilize It” campaign, stressing that respectful dialogue can take place among people of differing political views.

Tony Stieritz, director of Catholic social action in the archdiocese, said the campaign is about appreciating and valuing the viewpoints of others, especially during the election season.

“This is something that has been a long time coming where we felt in addition to our ongoing message of (the bishops’) ‘Faithful Citizenship’ document that we just need to be more proactive, highlighting not just what the church teaches but how do we exemplify civil behavior,” Stieritz told Catholic News Service.

He said the campaign is rooted in Pope Francis’ message to Congress in September and making it a reality in places like Cincinnati.

“What Pope Francis is trying to consistently tell us is that we’re about evangelization, we’re not on the defensive. We’ve got to see how the Holy Spirit is actively working in the other person’s life,” Stieritz explained.

Reflecting the wide appeal of the message, the campaign is a collaborative effort involving the archdiocesan offices of Family and Respect Life, New Evangelization and Communications in addition to Catholic Social Action.

The campaign website — www.civilizeit.us — invites people to consider taking a three-part pledge to respect civility, to reflect clarity in their point of view and to encounter others with compassion.

Civilize It” kicked off in the spring with representatives of about 30 parishes learning about the initiative and ideas for the future. They received “swag bags” containing pin-back buttons, car magnets and yard signs bearing the campaign logo, all inviting people to learn more.

The campaign’s basic message will be shared during sessions on the “Faithful Citizenship” document as the election moves from the nominating conventions toward Election Day in November, Stieritz said. “Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship” is the U.S. bishops’ quadrennial document, accompanied study guides, bulletin inserts and other discussion materials.

In rollouts of “Civilize It” at parishes and during opening day festivities for the Cincinnati Reds baseball season, the message has been well received, campaign organizers told CNS.

At Bellarmine Chapel, the Catholic parish affiliated with Jesuit-run Xavier University, parishioners eagerly grabbed materials to display on their cars and in their yards when they were made available in mid-April, said Tim Severyn, director of social mission.

“(The campaign) provides an opportunity to dialogue with each other and see where some of the common ground is in our Catholic faith and not get so caught up in the political diatribes that often sweep us away in a presidential campaign,” Severyn said.

Across town, Mary Anne Bressler, pastoral associate at St. Anthony Parish, said the “idea of civil engagement” for which the campaign calls was welcomed by parishioners when they learned about it in April.

“We just spent a lot of our time looking at the people in the other party and the ways they don’t conform to our beliefs,” she said, explaining that she expects parishioners will respectfully begin “to hold our own candidate’s feet to the fire” when their stances do not align with Catholic values.

Both parish staffers said they hope their community’s involvement in “Civilize It” will encourage nearby parishes as well as other religious congregations to embrace the message of civility in political conversations.

For the future, Stieritz and collaborators are considering plans for “civility” parties in which people are invited to come together — with food and drink, of course — to discuss key issues in the presidential campaign.

“I would say without a doubt, the vast majority of people (who have seen the message) said, ‘Thank goodness somebody’s doing this.'” Stieritz said. But some also expresses skepticism, he said.

“Who knows how much of an impact we’ll have or not,” he added. “Anytime you’re trying to change the cultural momentum at a given time, you’ve just got to go right into it. You’ve got to present an alternative message. The Holy Spirit will do with it what the Holy Spirit wants to do.”

– – –

Story by Dennis Sadowski (on Twitter @DennisSadowski)

1 day 11 hours
From the May 27, 1966 edition of The Catholic Telegraph. (CT File)From the May 27, 1966 edition of The Catholic Telegraph. (CT File)

On Memorial Day, the United States pauses to remember the men and women who died in service to our nation’s military.

Joining with all those who will celebrate this holiday May 30, The Catholic Telegraph staff expresses its appreciation and prayers for all who died in service to the nation, and additionally to all who continue to serve.

The main image for today’s #ThrowbackThursday comes from the May 26, 1966 edition of The Catholic Telegraph. It is a full page ad sponsored by the newspaper and handful of local businesses intended not to sell anything, but to thank and honor those for whom Memorial Day is celebrated.

Also included in this post is small clipping from a mid-1940s edition of The Catholic Telegraph. During World War II, almost every issue of the newspaper included a casualty report of Catholic men who died in the war.

During World War II, clippings like the one above were common in the pages of The Catholic Telegraph. (CT File)During World War II, clippings like the one above were common in the pages of The Catholic Telegraph. (CT File)

Catholics can do more than honor the dead, they can pray for them. With that in mind, please visit TheCatholicTelegraph.com’s Mass Times listing for special Memorial Day Masses at local cemeteries and read below a Prayer for Memorial Day, obtained from USCCB.org.

God of power and mercy,
you destroy war and put down earthly pride.
Banish violence from our midst and wipe away our tears,
that we may all deserve to be called your sons and daughters.
Keep in your mercy those men and women
who have died in the cause of freedom
and bring them safely
into your kingdom of justice and peace.
We ask this though Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen

Welcome to The Catholic Telegraph’s edition of Throwback Thursday. Throwback Thursday is a weekly online feature wherein users of social media share an old photo or anecdote about times gone by. We use Throwback Thursday to highlight the history of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, and our publication.

Recent Throwback Thursdays
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1 day 20 hours

IMAGE: CNS/Paul Haring

By Cindy Wooden

ROME (CNS) — A Corpus Christi procession should honor Christ’s gift of himself in the Eucharist, but also should be a pledge to share bread and faith with the people of the cities and towns where the processions take place, Pope Francis said.

Just as the “breaking of the bread” became the icon of the early Christian community, giving of oneself in order to nourish others spiritually and physically should be a sign of Christians today, the pope said May 26, the feast of the Body and Blood of Christ.

On a warm spring evening, the pope’s celebration began with Mass outside Rome’s Basilica of St. John Lateran and was to be followed by a traditional Corpus Christi procession from St. John Lateran to the Basilica of St. Mary Major, one mile away. Hundreds of members of parish and diocesan confraternities and sodalities — dressed in blue, brown, black or white capes and robes — joined the pope for Mass and would make the nighttime walk to St. Mary Major for eucharistic benediction with him.

“May this action of the eucharistic procession, which we will carry out shortly, respond to Jesus’ command,” he said in his homily. The procession should be “an action to commemorate him; an action to give food to the crowds of today; an act to break open our faith and our lives as a sign of Christ’s love for this city and for the whole world.”

In every celebration of the Eucharist, the pope said, the people place simple bread and wine into “poor hands anointed by the Holy Spirit” and Jesus “gives us his body and his blood.”

The people’s gifts are an important part of the process, just as they were when Jesus fed the multitude with five loaves and two fish, Pope Francis said.

“Indeed,” he said, “it is Jesus who blesses and breaks the loaves and provides sufficient food to satisfy the whole crowd, but it is the disciples who offer the five loaves and two fish.”

“Jesus wanted it this way,” he said. Rather than letting the disciples send the people away to find food, Jesus wanted the disciples to “put at his disposal what little they had.”

“And there is another gesture: The pieces of bread, broken by the holy and venerable hands of Our Lord, pass into the poor hands of the disciples, who distribute these to the people,” Pope Francis said.

The miracle of the multiplication of loaves and fish, he said, “signals what Christ wants to accomplish for the salvation of all mankind, giving his own flesh and blood. And yet this needs always to happen through those two small actions: offering the few loaves and fish which we have; receiving the bread broken by the hands of Jesus and giving it to all.”

Later in the Mass, a couple with four children and a grandmother with her three grandchildren brought the gifts of bread and wine to the pope for consecration.

Pope Francis urged the crowd gathered on the lawn outside the basilica to consider all the holy men and women throughout history who have given their lives, “‘broken’ themselves,” in order to nourish others.

“How many mothers, how many fathers, together with the slices of bread they provide each day on the tables of their homes, have broken their hearts to let their children grow, and grow well,” he said. “How many Christians, as responsible citizens, have broken their own lives to defend the dignity of all, especially the poorest, the marginalized and those discriminated!”

The source of strength for such given, he said, is found in “the Eucharist, in the power of the risen Lord’s love, who today too breaks bread for us and repeats: ‘Do this in remembrance of me.'”

– – –

Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

2 days 48 min

IMAGE: CNS photo/Paulo Cunha, EPA

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — When then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger met the press in 2000 for the formal release of the so-called Third Secret of Fatima, he said he knew many people would be disappointed.

Almost 16 years later, at the beginning of a yearlong preparation for the 100th anniversary of the apparition of our Lady of Fatima in 2017, now-retired Pope Benedict XVI is still dealing with people not convinced the secret is really out.

An online journal called OnePeterFive published an article May 15 claiming that shortly after then-Cardinal Ratzinger released the secret and his commentary, affirming that it was the complete text, he told a German priest that, in fact, it was not.

“There is more than what we published,” the article claimed the cardinal told Father Ingo Dollinger. The article went further: “He also told Dollinger that the published part of the secret is authentic and that the unpublished part of the secret speaks about ‘a bad council and a bad Mass’ that was to come in the near future.”

A statement released May 21 by the Vatican press office said Pope Benedict “declares ‘never to have spoken with Professor Dollinger about Fatima,’ clearly affirming that the remarks attributed to Professor Dollinger on the matter ‘are pure inventions, absolutely untrue,’ and he confirms decisively that ‘the publication of the Third Secret of Fatima is complete.'”

The Vatican’s publication of “The Message of Fatima” in 2000 included a photocopy of the text handwritten in 1944 by Carmelite Sister Lucia dos Santos, the last survivor of the three children who saw Mary at Fatima in 1917.

Speculation naturally swirls around secrets, and when a secret is held for decades, the assumptions gain ground and followers.

The common message of Marian apparitions throughout the centuries has been: pray and convert. But a message read only by a few popes and their closest aides? There had to be something more to it to justify keeping it so secret, many people thought.

When Cardinal Ratzinger presented the text in the Vatican press office June 26, 2000, he told reporters that the choice of St. John XXIII and Blessed Paul VI to withhold publication and St. John Paul II’s decision to delay it was not a “dogmatic decision but one of prudence.”

But, he said, “looking back, I would certainly say that we have paid a price” for the delay, which allowed the spread of apocalyptic theories about its contents.

Meeting the press that day, the first words out of his mouth were: “One who carefully reads the text of the so-called third secret of Fatima will probably be disappointed or surprised after all the speculation there has been.”

The text, he said, uses “symbolic language” to describe “the church of the martyrs of the century now past,” particularly the victims of two world wars, Nazism and communism.

But what was most difficult for many to believe after the secret spent more than 40 years in a Vatican vault was what the text did not contain. “No great mystery is revealed,” Cardinal Ratzinger said. “The veil of the future is not torn.”

In a 1996 interview with Portugal’s main Catholic radio station, the cardinal — who already had read the secret — tried the reasonable, tradition-based approach to pointing out what was and was not in the message. “The Virgin does not engage in sensationalism; she does not create fear,” he said. “She does not present apocalyptic visions, but guides people to her Son.”

Cardinal Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI five years after the text was published. If there was more to the secret, he had eight years of complete freedom as supreme pontiff to share what supposedly was withheld.

Marianist Father Johann Roten, a former student of then-Father Joseph Ratzinger who for years headed the Marian Research Institute at the University of Dayton, said there is “no doubt there is truth” in what many Fatima devotees see as “the moral decline in the church.”

“The difficulty is in the method” many of them choose to convince others of the need for conversion and prayer, Father Roten said in an email response to questions.

“The method tends to be magico-ritualistic, based on the conviction that a particular act,” such as the consecration of Russia performed in a particular way, “will solve all problems,” he said.

“Apparitions always stress the message of Christ,” Father Roten said. Mary urges “prayer, conversion and practical manifestations of one’s faith.”

“Warnings are part of the message, not always, but especially in times of imminent social catastrophe,” including Fatima before the Russian Revolution, he said. “Unfortunately, these general messages are frequently overlooked. Instead the attention is given to sensationalism — a rosary turning golden — or apocalypticism — doomsday warnings — which never represent the essential part and reasons of such events.”

Speaking to reporters traveling with him to Fatima in 2010, Pope Benedict repeated what he had said 10 years earlier: The text was open to interpretation, but the heart of the Fatima message was a call “to ongoing conversion, penance, prayer and the three theological virtues: faith, hope and charity.”

Yes, he said, the church constantly is under attack — “attacks from within and without — yet the forces of good are also ever present and, in the end, the Lord is more powerful than evil and Our Lady is for us the visible, motherly guarantee of God’s goodness, which is always the last word in history.”

– – –

Editors: The Vatican’s publication of “The Message of Fatima,” including the photocopies of Sister Lucia’s original description of the “secret” is still available online at: http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20000626_message-fatima_en.html.

– – –

Follow Wooden on Twitter: @Cindy_Wooden.

– – –

Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

2 days 3 hours

IMAGE: CNS/Paul Haring

By Carol Glatz

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — The former secretary to a saint and the oldest member of the College of Cardinals died May 26 at the age of 100.

Italian Cardinal Loris Capovilla, who served St. John XXIII before and after he became pope, died in Bergamo, near Milan.

Cardinal Capovilla was born in Pontelongo, Italy, on Oct. 14, 1915, and ordained to the priesthood in 1940.

A journalist before starting to work for the future saint, he was an energetic and eloquent storyteller, drawing on his remarkable and vividly detailed memory.

When the freshly named patriarch of Venice, Cardinal Angelo Roncalli, chose 37-year-old Father Capovilla as his private secretary in 1953, a skeptical adviser told the cardinal — who would become Pope John XXIII — that the priest looked too sickly to bear the strain of his new job.

But the cardinal outlived his employer by half a century and was a dedicated custodian of his legacy, running a small museum dedicated to the saint’s memory in the late pope’s native town of Sotto il Monte Giovanni XXIII, near Milan.

A friend and confidant, he was by the pope’s side during a pivotal point in the church and the world’s history: for the launch of the Second Vatican Council and the escalation of political and military tensions of the Cold War.

He turned many of his stories into numerous writings, including a memoir published in English as “The Heart and Mind of John XXIII.”

The papal secretary also served Pope Paul VI for a time after his election, following St. John’s death in 1963. He was made archbishop of Chieti-Vasto in 1967 and appointed prelate of Loreto in 1971, retiring in 1988.

Pope Francis made him the world’s oldest living cardinal when he elevated him to the College of Cardinals in 2014 at the age of 98.

Some observers saw the honor as an indirect tribute to Pope John, whom Pope Francis canonized just one month later.

But the then-cardinal-designate told Catholic News Service at the time, in a telephone conversation, that his elevation was a “sign of attention to all those thousands of priests around the world who have spent their lives in silence, in poverty, in obedience, happy to serve God and our humble people, who need, as Pope Francis continually says, tenderness, friendship, respect and love.”

In a telegram May 27 to the bishop of Bergamo, Pope Francis offered his condolences and expressed his affection for “this dear brother who, in his long and fruitful life, gave witness to the Gospel with joy and meekly served the church.”

He praised the late cardinal’s attentive and caring service to St. John as well as for being the “dedicated custodian” of his historical memory and “valid interpreter” of his ministry. 

The pope said Cardinal Capovilla had always been fully dedicated to the well being of priests and the faithful, reflecting “a firm devotion to the direction of the Second Vatican Council.”

Cardinal Capovilla’s death leaves the College of Cardinals with 213 members, 114 of whom are under the age of 80 and therefore eligible to vote in a conclave.

– – –

Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

2 days 3 hours
A St. Gertrude student crowns a statue of the Blessed Virgin during May Crowning 2016. (Courtesy Photo)A St. Gertrude student crowns a statue of the Blessed Virgin during May Crowning 2016. (Courtesy Photo) Lehman Catholic student Diana Gibson crowns Mary as Emma Simpson (right bottom) and Cassidy Hemm (left bottom) bring gifts of flowers to the Holy Mother during the recent May Crowning ceremony held at Lehman Catholic High School. (Courtesy Photo)Lehman Catholic student Diana Gibson crowns Mary as Emma Simpson (right bottom) and Cassidy Hemm (left bottom) bring gifts of flowers to the Holy Mother during the recent May Crowning ceremony held at Lehman Catholic High School. (Courtesy Photo)

The month of May in the Catholic Church is traditionally a time to honor Mary, the Mother of God.

Lehman Catholic High School, St. Gertrude School in Madeira and St. Ursula Academy were among the schools in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati to continue the traditions of May Crownings this year.

The custom of crowning a statue of Our Lady, or laying flowers at its base, began in Italy in the 1750s.  The practice quickly spread across Europe and was often done on May 31, the feast day of the Queenship of Mary.

In the United States, May Crownings were especially popular in the 1950’s and were often big events on the calendars of Catholic schools and parishes.

After the Second Vatican Council of the Catholic Church in the late 1950s, the practice was discouraged for a time because it was thought that too much attention was being given to Mary and that the faithful should be giving their full attention to Jesus.

In the 1970’s, under Pope John Paul II, there was a resurgence of Marian devotion in the Catholic Church, allowing May Crowning to again become a popular custom.

Saint Ursula Academy seniors Gabrielle Silvestri (left) and Sarah Tippenhauer (right) crowned a statue of the Blessed Mother Mary during a May Crowning ceremony in the Saint Ursula Academy chapel on April 29.Saint Ursula Academy seniors Gabrielle Silvestri (left) and Sarah Tippenhauer (right) crowned a statue of the Blessed Mother Mary during a May Crowning ceremony in the Saint Ursula Academy chapel on April 29.

May Crowning background provided by Lehman Catholic High School.

2 days 4 hours
The June 2016 print edition of The Catholic Telegraph begins arriving in homes May 27. (CT File)The June 2016 print edition of The Catholic Telegraph begins arriving in homes May 27. (CT File)

A 12-page special section highlighting high school graduation and a five pages covering recent ordinations to the permanent diaconate are the primary features in the 44-page June 2016 print edition of The Catholic Telegraph.

The newspaper should arrive in mailboxes beginning Friday, May 27.

The graduation section begins on page 17 and reports that more than 3,200 students will graduate from Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati this year. Graduate profiles from Fenwick, Catholic Central, Roger Bacon, McNicholas and Elder also appear in the section.

The diaconate coverage includes each of the 18 newly-ordained deacons responding to a questionnaire, and several photos from their ordination April 30.

The issue also features a story on Maronite Patriarch His Beatitude Mar Bechara Peter Cardinal Rai, who will visit the archdiocese in July as part of the Fortnight for Freedom.

Other stories:

  • The Oratory-in-Formation of the St. Phillip Neri Community celebrated the dedication of its residence with a blessing by Archbishop Dennis M. Schnurr.
  • A chef at St. Rita School for the Deaf is featured in Body & Soul, sharing about his work helping students.
  • A ministry out of St. Aloysius in Shandon is helping Healthy Moms and Babes by providing financial assistance and more.

Popular features like Everyday Evangelist and commentary from Jeanne Hunt and Michael Daley return, as well as many other stories.

Coverage of priestly ordination does not appear in the June edition as ordination took place after deadline. Priestly ordination coverage will appear in the July edition and is available online HERE.

Not a subscriber?

Many, but not all, of the stories from the June 2016 print edition will appear online over the course of the month. To make sure you don’t miss a single story, subscribe to the print edition HERE at no personal cost.

2 days 7 hours

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The Vatican press office has taken the unusual step of issuing a statement to denounce public remarks by Francesca Chaouqui, one of the defendants in the "Vatileaks II" ... 2 days 4 hours
Cardinal Loris Capovilla, who served as private secretary to Pope John XXIII, died on May 26. Cardinal Capovilla had been the oldest member of the College of Cardinals, having ... 2 days 4 hours
Archbishop Ramon Arguelles of Lipa has joined forces with a leading local imam to protest the construction of new coal-powered plants. At a recent Mass attended by 10,000 people, the ... 2 days 12 hours
A parish in McAllen, Texas, has aided over 35,000 migrants during the past two years, with the number of migrants surging to over 200 daily on some days this month, according to a ... 2 days 13 hours
At the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, the president of the Church’s federation of relief and development agencies called for a greater role for religious organizations in aid ... 2 days 14 hours
A Syrian bishop lamented ISIS attacks on Tartus and Jableh, two coastal cities located in territory held by the nation’s government. Tartus and Jableh are located in a region to ... 2 days 14 hours
Addressing the World Health Organization’s annual World Health Assembly, a Vatican official welcomed the call for universal health coverage in the United Nation’s Sustainable ... 2 days 15 hours
Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican’s Secretary of State, has sent a message in the name of Pope Francis to the Agostino Gemelli University Polyclinic in Rome on the occasion of a ... 2 days 15 hours

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From: Tristate Catholic news and features, daily
Posted
Memorial Day Masses and services will be held Catholic cemeteries around the region.

Memorial Day Masses and services will be held Catholic cemeteries around the region.

Through May 31, “The Fairest of All: Rediscovering Mary.” Paintings by Jan Oliver-Schultz at the University of Dayton (OH) Roesch Library. Exhibit is located on the building’s seventh floor, tours for groups available. For information on exhibits, hours, directions, and parking, see udayton.edu/imri/marian-library/about-us.php.

May 27, Dvorak’s Stabat Mater at Music Hall. A rarely performed masterpiece brings the audience from grief to hope with Mary, from the foot of the cross to the resurrection. A 2016 May Festival event; for ticket prices and information go to mayfestival.com.

May 28, Corpus Christi Procession at Emmanuel Catholic Church (Dayton, OH), following 5:15 Mass. The Eucharist will be carried out into the street in procession and will follow a path lined with colorful religious artwork made from dyed wood shavings that are designed by the youth of the parish.  All are welcome to participate!

May 28, Corpus Christi Mass and Procession at All Saints-St. Paul New Alsace, 5:30 pm.

May 28, Mendelssohn’s “Elijah,” 8 pm. Telling the story of  Elijah from his calling as a prophet to his ascension into Heaven in a flaming chariot; one of the May Festivals best-loved concerts returns. A 2016 May Festival event; for ticket prices and information go to mayfestival.com.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at Our Lady of the Rosary Church (Greenhills, OH) following 11:30 am Mass. First-ever Corpus Christi procession for this parish; all welcome!

May 29, Corpus Christi Mass and Procession at All Saints – St. John Campus (Guilford, IN), 11 am.

May 29, 19th Annual Price Hill Corpus Christi Procession from St. Teresa of Avila Church to St. William Church (Cincinnati), 2 pm. Begins with prayer service at St. Teresa of Avila, followed by procession to St. William. For information on parking, etc., call  513.921.0247.

May 29, Sung Mass and Corpus Christi Procession at Old St. Mary’s Church (Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati), 9 am.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Cecilia Church (Oakley/Cincinnati), following 10 am Mass. All are invited to  join the parishioners of St. Cecilia for this centuries-old tradition of adoration and evangelization, as they process with the Blessed Sacrament along the streets of Oakley. There will be stops along the way for prayer and singing.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Clement Church (St. Bernard, OH), 6:30 pm.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at Queen of Peace Church (Millville, OH), following 11 am Mass. A Rosary will be recited during the procession through the streets along with singing, and at the end, a Solemn Benediction will take place in Church

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Gertrude the Great Church (Madeira, OH), following 12:30 pm Mass. The Dominican Friars and Novices will be in attendance and the parish will also celebrate the second anniversary of its Mother of Mercy Perpetual Adoration Chapel.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Remy Church (Russia, OH) following 11 am Mass. Route: through the Village of Russia.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Julie Billiart Church (Hamilton, OH), following 11 am Mass. First Communicants will help lead the procession, which will include both the parish’s English- and Spanish-speaking members.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Peter in Chains Cathedral, following 11 am Mass. The Blessed Sacrament will be carried through the cathedral, concluding in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel with Benediction.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession from Our Lady of the Rosary Church to Holy Cross Church(Dayton, OH) following 11 am Mass. Distance is seven-tenths of a mile. All are invited to participate as a demonstration of our Catholic belief in the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. Call the St. Peter Parish Administration Office at 233-1503 for  information.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession for St. Louis (Owensville, OH), Holy Trinity (Batavia), St. Philomena (Stonelick) and St. Ann (Williamsburg), 1:30 pm. Procession begins at St Louis church and ends with Benediction in the park — the first Corpus Christi procession for the four-parish region in six years.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church (Burlington, KY) following 12:30 pm Mass. Mass will end with Exposition, followed by a procession out to the church and around our parking lot. Several Eucharistic litanies are chanted and recited during the procession, which concludes in the church with  Benediction

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at the Church of the Immaculate Conception (Dayton, OH), following 11 am Mass. Procession to the outdoor shrine of Our Lady of Belmont.  

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at St. Paul Catholic Church (Yellow Springs, OH), following 11 am Mass. Join St. Paul for what may be its last Corpus Christi procession — the parish will become part of a parish region in July when pastor, Fr. Anthony Geraci, reitres, so much will be changed. Procession will go on rain or shine: If good weather, it will be outside around the chruch with bells and incense. If good weather, “we will do a few laps around the interior of the church in grand style.” In either case the choir will lead the Tantum Ergo at the Reposition — “and we do have a pretty good choir.” All welcome: ”“This is one for the books.  Please come and join us as we finish the Solemnities of Ordinary Time with a bang.

May 29, Corpus Christi Procession at Holy Trinity Church (West Union, OH) following 11 am Mass. The Knights of Columbus will be serving all ministries of the Mass as well.

May 29, Memorial Day Mass at Calvary Cemetery (Dayton, OH), 11:30 am.

May 29, Matt Maher Concert at Moeller High School (Montgomery/Cincinnati), 7:30 pm. Catholic singer/songwriter Matt Maher will be part of an evening of activities. Mass at 4 pm in the Moeller gym (all welcome)  followed by food and music by Moeller grad Matt Schneider in the courtyard from 5-7 pm (VIP tickets required) VIP meet and greet 5:30-6:30. Doors open at 6. Advance tickets $10 (students), $20 (general seating), or $50 (VIP tickets – include preferred seating). Ticekts at the door $25. For information call the Spirit Shop at 513-791-1680 x 1104.

May 30, Pro-Life Contingent to Walk in the HamiltonMemorial Day Parade, 10 am. Walk with Right to Life of Butler County and memorialize those lost to abortion as well as honoring those who gave their lives defending our country. Themes: “Adoption, the Loving Option” and “The Mercy and Forgiveness of Jesus Christ.” Be a public witness for teh sacred gift of life. For information, call 867- 1832.

May 30th, Annual Memorial Day Service at Baltimore Pike Cemetery (North Fairmount/Cincinnati), 10 am. See the cemetery’s new World War I and World War II memorials and remember the fallen, especially those laid to rest in the last year.

May 30, Memorial Mass at St. Stephen Cemetery (Ft. Thomas, KY), 10 am. Bishop Roger Foys will celebrate. All people of the diocese are invited to participate in this Mass and to pray for all the dead, especially loved ones who have died.

May 30, Memorial Day Field Mass at Gate of Heaven Cemetery (Montgomery, OH), 11 am. Bishop Joe Binzer will celebrate this annual outdoor Mass. Please bring a lawn chair; in case of rain the Mass will be clebrated at Good Shepherd Church.

For more Catholic events, see our Events page.

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Archbishop Schnurr at an evening 40 Days for Life vigil last year -- it won't be dark or cold tonight! Photo courtesy 40 Days for Life - Cincinnati.

Archbishop Schnurr at an evening 40 Days for Life vigil last year — it won’t be dark or cold tonight! Photo courtesy 40 Days for Life – Cincinnati.

From 40 Days for Life – Cincinnati:

 

We will meet in front of Planned Parenthood on Auburn Avenue at 7 pm this Friday evening, May 27, for our monthly “Interim” Friday Prayer Vigil between the 2016 Spring and Fall 40 Days for Life campaigns.

 

All are encouraged to join us.  If you have never been in person to pray at Planned Parenthood, this is a good way to introduce yourself to public prayer.  You will not be alone and will get an idea of what it is like to take part in peaceful, public prayer witness.  

 

Join us as we witness to the community and pray that the lives of the innocent unborn are spared from abortion as well as for a change of heart for all those involved in the tragedy of the culture of death.  You will be blessed for your efforts and strengthened in your spiritual journey.   You never know who you might affect just by your presence.

 

Families are welcome.  Parking is available on the streets or at Holy Name Catholic Church, two blocks from Planned Parenthood.

 

For more information see 40daysforlife.com and and the 40 Days for Life-Cincinnati Facebook page,

 

For more Catholic events, see our Events page.

 

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1 day 18 hours
St. Henry District High School students at the Strikeout Cancer softball tournament this spring. SHDHS, Dixie High School, and Notre Dame Academy participated.

St. Henry District High School students at the Strikeout Cancer softball tournament this spring. SHDHS, Dixie High School, and Notre Dame Academy participated.

Students from Dixie Heights, Notre Dame Academy, and St Henry District High Schools battled it out at this year’s Strikeout Cancer softball tournament. SHDHS freshman Alex Shea, recently diagnosed with lymphoma, got a shoutout from the crowd when his sister, Brooke, threw out the first pitch in one of the games. All proceeds from the even went to the Dragonfly Foundation, which helps children and young adults enduring cancer and bone marrow transplants.

Strikeout Cancer is a project of the National Fastpitch Softball Coaches Association; for information about Strikeout Cancer games across the country or how to hold one, click here.

Photo courtesy St. Henry District High School.

You can see all our 1000 Words photos at once: Click on “1000 Words” in the menu at the top of the page, or click here. To submit a photo, send it to TheCatholicBeat@gmail.com.

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1 day 18 hours
So good it went viral! It really is the world's best.

So good it went viral! It really is the world’s best.

Milk and cream are mentioned many times in the Bible. A popular passage is this one from Exodus 33:3 ­ The lord is talking to Moses about leading his people to the promised land, a land “flowing with milk and honey.”

 

People of Bible Days drank mostly goats’ milk, since goats gave a rich supply and were adapted to that climate. oday goats’ milk is popular, since it’s already homogenized and very healthy for those who can’t drink cows’ milk. It’s also a soothing addition to the bath ­  use powdered goats’ milk along with a fragrant oil in my bath.

 

Both goat and cow’s milk can be healthy choices. The perception with milk is that it puts on weight. But there are lots of varieties of milk, including the lower fat cow milks. Milk is loaded with phosphorus and that is necessary, as it works with the calcium in milk to help keep bones strong. It’s also a great source of protein, as you know. And milk has vitamin D, vitamin A and other nutrients  And as far as weight control goes, milk actually helps you lose weight, as it can help you feel full and hydrated all at the same time.

 

Evaporated milk is milk that has half the water removed and then it is processed for canning. Condensed milk is milk that has half the water removed, and sugar is added, as well. These two are not interchangeable!

 

World’s best slow cooker creamed corn

 

The slow cooker creamed corn is so popular that just about everyone wants to make it. .The recipe has gone viral it’s that good! Perfect for a Memorial Day picnic.

 

  • 2 ­1/2 pounds frozen yellow corn
  • 1 cup whipping cream (you could also use half & half)
  • 8 oz. cream cheese, room temperature, chunked up
  • 1/2 cup shredded or grated Parmesan cheese
  • 6 tablespoons butter, room temperature, cut up
  • 1 tablespoon sugar or substitute
  • Salt and pepper to taste 

Spray slow cooker. Put cream, crew, cheese and butter in slow cooker and whisk until almost smooth. Stir in rest of ingredients. Cover and cook on low 4­-5 hours, stirring occasionally, or until mixture is smooth and creamy and corn is crisp tender.

 

Rita Heikenfeld.

Rita Heikenfeld.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld writes a weekly syndicated column and blog for the Community Press, appears every Thursday on the Son Rise Morning Show, and is the author of several cookbooks. An adjunct professor at the University of Cincinnati, she is Certified Culinary Professional and Certified Modern Herbalist,  the Culinary Professional for Jungle Jim’s Eastgate, and a media personality with a cable show and YouTube videos. In 2014 she was inducted into the Escoffier Hall of Fame. She lives “in the sticks” outside Batavia, Ohio with her family, where they heat with wood, raise chickens for eggs, and grow their own produce and herbs. You’ll find all her previous recipes featured on The Catholic Beat here.

Rita’s Bible Foods segment airs on the Son Rise Morning Show every Thursday morning at 7:22 am (rebroadcast Friday at 6:02 am). Tune in to hear her discuss the history behind each recipe and the scripture verses that inspired it. And of course, for cooking tips!

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2 days 18 hours
The high altar at "St. Bonnies" in South Fairmount/Cincninati, in an undated photograph.

The high altar at “St. Bonnies” in South Fairmount/Cincinnati, in an undated photograph.

An undated photo f the altar at St. Bonaventure Church in South Fairmount/Cincinnati, closed down in 2004 and torn down shortly afterward.

 

The altar, side altars, and communion rail of “St. Bonnies” were not lost in the demolition — they’re now now at the Chapel of Divine Mercy of the Fathers of Mercy in Auburn, KY. The Fathers of Mercy is a congregation of priests who preach on God’s Mercy, especially as experienced thorugh the Mass and Confession, at parish missions and retreats.

Chapel of Divine Mercy, Auburn, KY.

Chapel of Divine Mercy, Auburn, KY.

 

According to the website Queen  Queen City Survey, the church’s rose window was moved to Holy Cross-Immaculata Church Mt.Adams/Cincinnati.

 

 

Photos courtesy the Old Photos of Cincinnati Facebook page and the Divine Mercy Fathers. For more photos of the Chapel of Divine Mercy, including many closeups of the altar, see this photo gallery.

 

You can see all our 1000 Words photos at once: Click on “1000 Words” in the menu at the top of the page, or click here. To submit a photo, send it to TheCatholicBeat@gmail.com.

Please share this story. To get local Catholic news, features and photos every day in your inbox, subscribe in the box at the top of every page or send a request to TheCatholicBeat@gmail.com.

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NewsFeeds from Zenit, EWTN, CatholicCulture.org

From: Latest News Releases from USCCB
Posted

WASHINGTON—Representatives from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops joined 40 Roman Catholic bishops, scholars and policy specialists from nine countries at a colloquium in London, England, May 24-25, to voice moral concerns about nuclear proliferation and the urgent need for disarmament.  

"The policy debate is ahead of the moral debate," said Bishop Oscar Cantú, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' (USCCB) Committee on International Justice and Peace. "We need to educate and empower new generations of Catholic leaders on the ethical and policy arguments for reducing and eliminating nuclear weapons."

The colloquium entitled "Catholic Approaches to Nuclear Proliferation and Disarmament" identified key issues, especially theological and moral issues, which need to be addressed in order to create the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons. It also highlighted policy issues on which religious leaders and ethicists have a comparative advantage or can make a distinctive contribution.

This event was sponsored by the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales; Deutsche Bischofskonferenz; Justice et Paix, Conférence des évêques de France; the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office of International Justice and Peace; the University of Notre Dame's Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies; Institut fur Theologie und Frieden; the Catholic Peacebuilding Network; Georgetown University's Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs; and the Nuclear Threat Initiative.  

The London Colloquium is part of an initiative in the United States to empower a new generation of Catholic bishops, scholars, professionals and students to address the ethical and policy challenges of reducing and eliminating nuclear weapons.  
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Keywords: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Bishop Oscar Cantú, Committee on International Justice and Peace, nuclear weapons, ethics, disarmament, nuclear proliferation
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MEDIA CONTACT:
Norma Montenegro Flynn
O: 202-541-3202

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