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Friday, November 30, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/30/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Thursday, November 29, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/29/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/28/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Tuesday, November 27, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/27/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Monday, November 26, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/26/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Sunday, November 25, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/25/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Saturday, November 24, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/24/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Friday, November 23, 2018 Daily Mass Readings

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 11/23/2018 - 4:00am
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Thursday, November 22, 2018 Daily Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 1 hour 35 min ago
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

Thursday, November 22, 2018 Thanksgiving Mass Reading

Bible: Daily Readings Audio USCCB - 1 hour 35 min ago
Daily Mass Readings from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States of America.

You can also read Daily Readings and view Daily Reflections by visiting www.usccb.org/bible/readings/
Categories: Daily Readings

SEEING THROUGH THE TEARS - One Bread, One Body, Nov 22, 2018

St. Cecilia
Revelation 5:1-10 | Psalm 149:1-6, 9 | Luke 19:41-44

"Coming within sight of the city, He wept over it." —Luke 19:41

The Church is renewed through a "vale of tears." We don't just pray and work for renewal; we cry for it. We will see the light through our tears when we love enough to weep bitterly (Rv 5:4) for Jesus to "open the scroll" (Rv 5:5), that is, ... More

Vatican, World Youth Day officials release pope’s Panama itinerary

Catholic Telegraph - 11/21/2018 - 3:55pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Bob Roller

By Junno Arocho Esteves

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — When Pope Francis visits Panama for World Youth Day in January, he will meet with young people not able to attend the festivities: some in jail and with some living with HIV.

He also will dedicate the altar of Panama’s newly renovated 400-year-old cathedral, meet with bishops from Central America and have lunch with some of the young people attending the youth day gathering, according to the schedule released by the Vatican Nov. 20.

The pope’s visit to Panama Jan. 23-27 will be his 26th trip outside of Italy. During his visit, he will deliver seven speeches and celebrate two Masses as well as a penitential liturgy.

The theme for World Youth Day 2019 is taken from the Gospel of St. Luke: "I am the servant of the Lord. May it be done to me according to your word."

The pope’s meeting with young people who will be unable to take part in the activities is a response to the Gospel’s call to clothe the naked, visit the sick and comfort the imprisoned, the organizing committee said in a Nov. 20 statement.

Archbishop Jose Domingo Ulloa Mendieta of Panama said Pope Francis’ meeting with young detainees will be "a very special event" in which "young people deprived of freedom will take part in a penitential liturgy with the Holy Father in an act of repentance, reconciliation and forgiveness," the committee said.

After the closing Mass for World Youth Day, the pope will visit Casa Hogar el Buen Samaritano (Good Samaritan Home), a center dedicated to helping HIV and AIDS patients "regardless of their sex, religion, sexual orientation, geographical origin" and "who lack the resources to live and cope with their illness."

The pope will also pray the Angelus there with young people from the Malambo hospice, which helps people addicted to drugs and alcohol, and from Hogar San Jose, a house for the poor run by the Missionaries of Charity and the Kkottongnae religious congregation.

Here is the detailed schedule released by the Vatican. All times are local, with Eastern Daylight Time in parentheses:

Wednesday, Jan. 23 (Rome, Panama)

— 9:35 a.m. (3:35 a.m.) Departure from Rome’s Fiumicino Airport.

— 4:30 p.m. Arrival at Tocumen International Airport in Panama.

— 4:50 p.m. Transfer to the apostolic nunciature.

Thursday, Jan. 24 (Panama)

— 9:45 a.m. Welcoming ceremony at Palacio de las Garzas presidential palace.

— 10 a.m. Courtesy visit with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela at Palacio de las Garzas.

— 10:40 a.m. Meeting with government authorities and the diplomatic corps at Bolivar Palace. Speech by pope.

— 11:15 a.m. Meeting with Central American bishops in the Church of St. Francis of Assisi. Speech by pope.

— 5:30 p.m. Welcoming ceremony and gathering with young people in Santa Maria la Antigua Field. Speech by pope.

Friday, Jan. 25 (Panama)

— 10:30 a.m. Penitential liturgy with juvenile delinquents in Las Garzas de Pacora Juvenile Detention Center in Pacora. Homily by pope.

— 11:50 a.m. Transfer by helicopter to the apostolic nunciature.

— 5:30 p.m. Way of the Cross with young people in Santa Maria la Antigua Field. Speech by pope.

Saturday, Jan. 26 (Panama)

— 9:15 a.m. Mass and dedication of the altar of the Cathedral Basilica of Santa Maria la Antigua with priests, men and women religious and lay movements. Homily by pope.

— 12:15 p.m. Lunch with young people at San Jose Major Seminary

— 6:30 p.m. Prayer vigil with young people at St. John Paul II Field. Speech by pope.

Sunday, Jan. 27 (Panama)

— 8:00 a.m. Mass at St. John Paul II Field to mark World Youth Day. Homily by pope.

— 10:45 a.m. Visit to Casa Hogar el Buen Samaritano (Good Samaritan Home). Speech and Angelus by pope.

— 4:30 p.m. Meeting with World Youth Day volunteers, the local organizing committee and benefactors at Rommel Fernandez Stadium. Speech by pope.

— 6:00 p.m. Farewell ceremony at Tocumen International Airport.

— 6:15 p.m. Departure from Tocumen International Airport.

Monday, Jan. 28 (Rome)

— 11:50 a.m. (5:50 a.m.) Arrival at Rome’s Ciampino Airport.

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Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju.

 

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Helping others can change the world, pope tells young people

Catholic Telegraph - 11/21/2018 - 2:28pm

IMAGE: CNS/Paul Haring

By Junno Arocho Esteves

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — In a video message to young men and women around the world, Pope Francis called on them to provoke an uprising of change by serving others.

In helping those who are suffering, both young believers and nonbelievers can find "a strength that can change the world," the pope said in a video message to youths for the upcoming World Youth Day in Panama.

"It is a revolution that can overturn the powerful forces at work in our world. It is the ‘revolution’ of service," he said in the message released by the Vatican Nov. 21.

The theme for the World Youth Day celebrations, which will take place Jan. 22-27, is taken from the Gospel of St. Luke, "May it be done to me according to your word."

In his message, the pope said those words uttered by Mary during the Annunciation are "the positive reply of one who understands the secret of vocation: to go beyond oneself and place oneself at the service of others."

Life, he said, can only find meaning when serving God and others. Like Mary, young people must engage "in conversation with God with an attitude of listening" so that they may discover their calling either in marriage, consecrated life or the priesthood.

"The important thing is to discover what God wants from us and to be brave enough to say ‘yes,’" the pope said. "When God has a proposition for us, like the one he had for Mary, it is not intended to extinguish our dreams, but to ignite our aspirations."

Pope Francis encouraged young people to say ‘yes’ to God’s calling, which is "the first step toward being happy and toward making many people happy."

"Dear young people," the pope said, "take courage, enter within yourselves and ask God: ‘What do you want from me?’ Allow God to answer you. Then you will see how your life is transformed and filled with joy."

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Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju

 

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

People must confront their evil desires, beg God for mercy, pope says

Catholic Telegraph - 11/21/2018 - 1:48pm

IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul Haring

By Carol Glatz

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — God handed down his commandments not for people to hypocritically follow the letter of the law with a proud and righteous heart, but for people to recognize the truth of their weaknesses and acknowledge their need for help, healing and salvation, Pope Francis said.

"Blessed are those who stop fooling themselves, believing they are able to save themselves from their weakness without God’s mercy," which is the only thing that can heal a troubled heart, he said Nov. 21 during his weekly general audience in St. Peter’s Square.

"Blessed are those who recognize their evil desires and, with a penitent and humiliated heart, stand before God and humanity, not as one of the righteous, but as a sinner," he said.

The pope continued his series of talks on the Ten Commandments, reflecting on the final commands, "You shall not covet … your neighbor’s wife" and "anything that belongs to your neighbor."

The last commandments, he said, encapsulate the essence of all of God’s commands — that every sin or transgression stems from "coveting" and being caught up in evil thoughts and desires.

The commandments aim to set clear limits, which, if they are crossed, do great harm to oneself and to one’s relationship with God and others, the pope said.

But what compels people to cross those boundaries? he asked.

All transgressions and sins, he said, stem from "one common inner root: evil desires." These desires "stir the heart and one enters the fray and ends up transgressing. But not a formal or legal transgression. A transgression that wounds, wounds oneself, wounds others."

He said Jesus explains in the Gospel of St. Mark that what is evil comes from what is inside a person, what is in their hearts — evil thoughts like, "unchastity, theft, murder, adultery, greed, malice, deceit, licentiousness, envy, blasphemy, arrogance, folly."

"Each one of us could ask ourselves which of these desires occurs often in me," as part of an examination of one’s heart and recognition of the truth, he said.

The Ten Commandments will have no impact or effect if people do not understand the source of sin is inside them and the challenge is to "free the heart from all of these evil and ugly things," the pope said.

God’s laws could be reduced to just a "beautiful facade of a life that is still the life of a slave and not children" of God, he said.

"Often, behind that pharisaical mask of asphyxiating correctness, something ugly and unresolved is hiding," he added.

"Instead, we must let ourselves be unmasked by the commandments" in order to reveal one’s spiritual poverty and be led to "a holy humiliation," recognizing one’s failings and pleading to God for salvation.

The laws of the Bible are not meant to "deceive people that a literal obedience (to the law) brings one to an artificial and, for that matter, unattainable salvation," he said.

The law is meant to bring people to the truth about themselves — to recognize their poverty and to authentically open themselves up to the mercy of God, "who transforms us and renews us. God is the only one who is able to renew our hearts as long as we open our heart to him. That’s the only condition."

The commandments help people face "the disarray of our hearts in order to stop living selfishly" and become authentic children of God, redeemed by the Son and taught and guided by the Holy Spirit.

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Cardinal DiNardo denies priests named in report 'credibly accused'

EWTN Latest Catholic News - 11/21/2018 - 12:20pm
Houston, Texas, Nov 21, 2018 / 11:20 am (EWTN News/CNA).- Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, Archbishop of Galveston-Houston, has denied that he allowed two priests to remain in active ministry despite credible allegations of sexual abuse against them.



India: Pontifical Mission Societies Aiding Disaster Victims

Zenit (The World Seen From Rome) - 11/21/2018 - 11:44am

It is urgent to alleviate the devastation and rescue the victims affected by the violent floods registered in the Indian states of Kerala and Karnataka in recent months and also in Tamil Nadu a few days ago: with this spirit the Pontifical Mission Societies (PMS) appeal to all people of good will, and launch an emergency fundraiser. The President of the PMS, Archbishop Giampietro Dal Toso, in an open letter, explains to the entire international network of the PMS that this was the worst natural disaster of the century in this region.

On receiving data and detailed information from the National Directorate of the PMS in India, Archbishop Dal Toso launched an appeal “to contribute to the PMS emergency Fund so that we can provide the necessary help to repair and reconstruct the ecclesiastical structures for the Christian faithful of India”.

The floods in Kerala last August left more than 1.5 million people homeless, causing estimated damage of at least 2.8 million dollars. Over 57,000 hectares of agricultural land have been flooded, 11,000 homes destroyed and 26,000 houses badly damaged. The Church responded by organizing over 4,000 camps to host refugees and mobilized over 100,000 volunteers. Many churches, shelters, Catholic institutions, dispensaries have been destroyed.

Over the past 50 years, the Pontifical Mission Societies have supported the dioceses of Kerala and Karnataka by offering a stable support for evangelization, as well as funding several thousand projects.

The Church in India has expressed and offered solidarity also towards the victims of the cyclone of Gaja which hit the coast of Tamil Nadu on the morning of 16 November. According to initial reports, 23 people have lost their lives about 82 thousand people find themselves in 471 rescue centers in six districts. The natural disaster caused its upheavals despite the preventive measures taken by the Tamil Nadu government.

The post India: Pontifical Mission Societies Aiding Disaster Victims appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Thanksgiving Day Mass Times

Catholic Telegraph - 11/21/2018 - 11:41am

The Catholic Telegraph Mass Times and More Calendar has released Mass Times for Thanksgiving Day.  A great way to start Thanksgiving Day is with the family and friends and attend a Mass near you. For the calendar, click here

Workshop: Educating Young People about Love and Friendship Through the Classics

Zenit (The World Seen From Rome) - 11/21/2018 - 11:39am

Popular literature, cinema, and fictional series profoundly influence young people’s understanding of love and friendship, as well as other personal and relational dimensions that shape a person’s character.

The workshop Educating young people about love and friendship through the classics aims to offer an in-depth look at six literary classics on these topics, which were then produced as films, so as to cultivate young people’s taste for great stories and to educate them better.

The works will be presented by an international team of writers and teachers with a highly trained educational sensibility.

The workshop Educating young people about love and friendship through the classics is by organized  Familyandmedia Chair Elina Gianoli Gainza of the Department of Communications of the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross (Rome).

Full Program

The post Workshop: Educating Young People about Love and Friendship Through the Classics appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Archbishop Gallagher: Message for World Fishing Day

Zenit (The World Seen From Rome) - 11/21/2018 - 11:17am

Archbishop Paul Gallagher, the Holy See’s Secretary for Relations with States, gave the concluding address at the November 21, 2018, event marking World Fishing Day. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the Mission, of the Permanent Observer of the Holy See, and the Department of Human Development Service
Integrale-Apostolato del Mare section organized the event at the FAO headquarters in Rome. The topic was “Labor rights are human rights – Working together for the rights of the fishermen and to step up the fight against trafficking in human beings and forced labor in the fishing industry.”

Following is Archbishop Gallagher’s Address:

Mr. Director General, Excellencies,

I am grateful for the invitation to participate in this Special event on the theme of Labour rights are human rights: working together to ensure the rights of fishers – fighting trafficking and forced labor in the fishing sector. Allow me to begin by expressing my gratitude to the FAO, the Dicastery for promoting Integral Human Development and the Permanent Mission of the Holy See to the FAO for providing us with the opportunity, on the occasion of World Fisheries Day, to focus our reflection on the importance of respect for fundamental human rights in this sector.

The legal framework of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides an important point of reference in efforts to promote social development and improve governance for fisheries in developing countries. While the fisheries sector in some countries lacks a systematic and sustained monitoring effort to track fundamental human rights concerns, which include, among other issues, forced evictions, detention without trial, child labor, forced labor and unsafe working conditions, as well as violence and personal security, these issues are by no means unique to fisheries. Fundamental human rights concerns affecting fishing communities are in many cases underappreciated and demand a more comprehensive monitoring and response.

The Holy See has always looked with particular attention to the reality of fishers, seafarers and their families. A clear indication of this involvement in the Apostolate of the Sea that has been active for more than a century, and in particular since 1957, when it was formally given its actual name. This initiative works for the pastoral, social, and material welfare of all seafarers and fishermen regardless of color, race or creed.[1]

In line with this tradition, today I would like to speak about fisheries, sustainable development, the dignity of work, and how it is not possible to guarantee dignified work without also ensuring respect of fundamental human rights.

One year ago, as recalled by the ILO Deputy Director General Mr. Moussa Oumaru, the ILO Work in Fishing Convention came into force, 10 years after its adoption. This was good news for more than 58 million people that are engaged in the sector. As the ILO data reported, approximately 37 percent of them are engaged full time, 23 percent part-time, and the remainder are either occasional fishers or of unspecified status. Over 15 million are working full-time on board fishing vessels.[2] In 2016, the total fish production reached an all-time high of 171 million tonnes, of which 88 percent was utilized for direct human consumption that resulted in a record-high per capita annual consumption of 20.3 kg.[3] Such data clearly indicate that this sector is of fundamental importance not only for its economic impact but, even more, in providing food for millions of people and the sustainability for thousands of coastal communities, in particular in the developing world. The goal of the Work in Fishing Convention is to prevent unacceptable forms of work for fishers all over the world, with a special focus on migrant fishers. While commending this important document, we are here today because a lot of work remains to be done to ensure that every employee in the fishing industry can enjoy the full respect of their human dignity.

In the last decades, globalization has witnessed the onset of more competition, inadequate wages and often harsh conditions for workers in this sector. In many countries, labor protections often remain inadequate or unenforced, exploitation is common as well as child labor and human trafficking. Unfortunately, fishery is one of the sectors in which we can see the most degrading and inhuman work conditions that are almost always followed by further negative repercussions, such as ongoing poverty and the absence of due respect for human dignity. We should not forget, furthermore, that the thousands of people involved in the commercial sea routes, which account for 90% of the merchandise transported globally, are often forced to spend weeks far from their families and communities in almost complete isolation. All of these situations that we are speaking about affect entire communities and, disproportionately, the most vulnerable and the poor, fostering marginalization and exclusion.

Moreover, in the attempt to tackle these problems, we face cross-cutting issues that link together not only labor exploitation, child labor and human trafficking, but even climate change and food security. In fact, the sustainability of the environment is at risk due to the excessive exploitation of maritime resources and illegal or unregulated fishing practices. If not properly addressed, these practices may jeopardize the food security of many countries, bringing economical damages and environmental problems, as well as harming the future of the next generations.

The Holy See, indeed, supports the approach presented in the most recent report of the FAO on “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2018” that affirms how “fisheries are not just seen as resources; they are also viewed as sources of livelihoods (e.g. income, food, employment), sites of expression of cultural values, and a buffer against shocks for poor communities.[4] Indeed, to tackle cross-cutting issues, the focus should be on sustainability and accountability, and international organizations should play a pivotal role in this regard. The international community should push for a more comprehensive and resolute approach, taking into account that, too often, small-scale fishers are left behind, because development policies have failed to address the structural uncertainties linked with their situation.

Since many of the problems of this sector are so firmly rooted, it is difficult to imagine how the action of any one international organization, NGO or even government could solve them on their own. What is needed is the cooperation of all of these actors, so as to obtain effective and concrete results that will allow for change in the lives of millions of poor and marginalized fishermen. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which celebrates its seventieth anniversary on December 10th, represents that kind of “shared” approach, based upon the fundamental cornerstone of the entire human rights framework that we should try to preserve, implement and replicate.

The Universal Declaration on Human Rights is the first and most important document from which began the international juridical discussion on human freedom and dignity. Unfortunately, the consensus that allowed the ratification of that document has weakened and the human rights framework is now facing new challenges and a growing lack of legitimacy all over the world.

Recognizing the legal framework already in place, we may identify three possible areas of action for facilitating a human rights-based approach in reforming the fisheries sector: (a) strengthening the capacity of this framework, to raise awareness of it, and to respond to specific incidents of fundamental human rights abuse; (b) applying a human rights-based approach to address the roots of vulnerability and exclusion in fishing-dependent communities; and (c) supporting fundamental human rights advocacy as a driver in the reform of the fisheries sector. These priorities for action, if implemented together, may help reduce the incidence of rights violations in fishing communities and improve the recourse available when there are legitimate grievances. Pursuing these priorities necessarily means a shift in orientation—or an expansion of the realm of attention—for many initiatives aimed at reforming the fisheries sector. Fundamental human rights advocacy can help create the conditions for small-scale fishing communities to have a voice in decisions regarding the allocation of resource rights, as well as to argue for social justice more broadly. Only then can we reasonably expect local fishing communities to commit themselves to build sustainable resource management over the long term. Regional economic and political groupings (such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, African Union, and the European Union), UN agencies, and other international institutions can exert different forms of pressure on States to act in accordance with international treaties on human rights. They can also incorporate fundamental human rights principles in global codes of conduct and regional agreements, as the European Union has done recently in its new fishing agreements with developing countries. Fishery sector organizations, from state agencies to producer and community organizations, can also play a critical role as proponents of reform, as monitors of progress, and as advocates of best practices to share with others. To remain grounded in local priorities, however, all such efforts need to recognize and reinforce the efforts of those whose rights are at risk.

In conclusion, we need to collaborate today more than ever before. We should propose a broader and more inclusive approach to the issues related to fisheries, aware of the suffering of so many brothers and sisters employed along the full length of the supply chain.

In this seventieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we should take the consensus that allowed the approval of this fundamental document as an example of overcoming a strictly economic approach, so as to emphasize the right to decent and safe work for everyone.

The Holy See strongly supports the efforts of the international community to put an end to the abuse and criminal practices still present in the fishery sector, it commends the work done by the FAO and assures its cooperation, as much as possible, through the involvement of Catholic institutions.

Thank you for your kind attention.

[1] http://www.apostolatusmaris.org/about/

[2] https://www.ilo.org/global/industries-and-sectors/shipping-ports-fisheries-inland-waterways/fisheries/lang– en/index.htm [

3] http://www.fao.org/3/i9540en/I9540EN.pdf [

4] http://www.fao.org/3/i9540en/I9540EN.pdf [01880-EN.01] [Original text: English]

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